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29
March
2013

A Special Day!

Exactly 49 years ago today, COSI opened its doors on Easter Sunday in the old Memorial Hall on 280 E. Broad St.

Sandy Hallock (read more about him at http://www.cosi.org/about-cosi/history/) had developed a dream for a new Columbus institution based on his lifelong interest in science and technology. His enthusiasm and vision gained the critical support of Hershel Stephan, Walter English, Preston Wolfe and the Franklin Historical Society Board (including Tad Jeffrey as a member). On opening day they welcomed over 5,000 people to see this new entity, COSI, helping launch a new era of what has become known as the worldwide science center movement -- with COSI one of its recognized founders and leaders.

A photo of 280 East Broad Street
29
March
2013

March Ratness at COSI

Every spring, March Madness sweeps the nation, turning even the most casual basketball fan into a rabid, number-crunching, bracket-obsessed enthusiast. But at COSI, we're in on the hoops hype every day, year-round, with fierce showdowns of our own.

We're talking rat basketball.
Rat Basketball at COSI
26
March
2013

What is Thundersnow?

Earlier this week we had a snow forecast that could really have affected our operations here at COSI. I was watching the weather forecasts really closely to determine how much of the possible 10 inches of snow we could get here in Columbus and one of the forecasters mentioned the possibility of thundersnow. This is a term I've heard of before, even experienced but I really don't know a lot about it. So I turned to our resident science guy extraordinaire, Steve Whitt and asked him what in the world is thundersnow? How does it form and what is it?
A picture of snow at COSI 3.25.2013.
03
January
2013

Brush Creek to Portsmouth

We completed the last leg of our Scioto River journey in August. We drove down to Shawnee State Park the night before in order to get an early start. Our plan was to put in on Scioto Brush Creek, a tributary of the Scioto and a popular waterway for canoeing. David Rutter brought his two sons along, so I shared a canoe with George – not his usual canoe, but the very first one he made 23 years ago. This sweet boat was a joy to ride in and I picked up some valuable lessons on paddling a canoe in the bargain.

We speculated about how much water would be in the creek given the lack of rain throughout the summer. We drove to the town of McDermott to take a look at the creek. Although getting the canoes in the water was challenging due to the steep bank, the creek itself seemed to have enough water to float us. That turned out to be deceptive!

Brush Creek to Portsmouth
21
November
2012

Sweet (Potato) Science

Sure, everyone knows about turkey, stuffing, and cranberry sauce. But somewhere hidden behind the gravy boat and that mountain of rolls, if you're very lucky this Thanksgiving you just might find a truly unique dish: candied sweet potatoes! My grandma used to make them the old-fashioned way - piled high with delicious, gooey marshmallows! Mmmm, marshmallows . . . I was a picky eater as a kid, but even I couldn't turn my nose at a vegetable that tasted like dessert.

What is a sweet potato, anyway? Turns out it's not a potato at all. It isn't closely related to white or yellow potatoes, the kind you mash up for Thanksgiving or deep fry and salt for, well, for just about any other day. Sweet potatoes also aren't closely related to yams, another tuber grown mostly in Southeast Asia. (What many people call candied yams are almost always in reality candied sweet potatoes.)

Sweet (Potato) Science
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