COSI Blog
17
May
2012

Kenton to LaRue (River Mile 213 - 195)

Kenton to LaRue (river mile 213 - 195)

Driving east out of Kenton on State Route 309, I find myself almost immediately back in farm country. County Road 144 veers off to the southeast and pretty much follows the course of the Scioto River. One unique aspect of the river at this part of its course is that it flows so close to the sub-continental divide – a ridge that divides the waters that flow south into the Ohio River from those that flow north into Lake Erie. This results in no permanent tributaries entering the Scioto from the north, but several adding their waters from the south. Wolf Creek, Jim Creek, Panther Creek and Wild Cat Run all flow north into to the Scioto over the course of the next several miles.

Kenton to LaRue (River Mile 213 - 195)
17
May
2012

BRAINTRIP: Trying New Things

We’re always experimenting and trying new things at COSI

Today our experiment is in the marketing of COSI – we announced at 12 Noon today the “Brain Trip: A year of cerebral challenges and minds-on exhibits”. This was our way to announce the next four traveling exhibits for 2012-2013.

14
May
2012

Betty Bryan Made COSI Special

She will be greatly missed

Great organizations are that way because of at least a few outstanding and impactful leaders. And those leaders are not necessarily the President & CEO.

COSI has been a great organization for a long time--known around the world for many achievements and innovations, one of the chief among them being our dedication to guest service. (My job in part, as CEO, is just not to screw up some of the key areas of achievement and positive culture we have at COSI ;-)

Betty Bryan Made COSI Special
09
May
2012

A Blast (of Gas) from the Past

Imagine you’re a Trogdorian, living on the planet Trogdor seventy-five light years from Earth. It is ninety million years ago, and your planet has just developed the technology to survey nearby worlds for signs of life.

You train your ultra-sensitive space telescope on a pretty solar system with a yellow star and eight smaller worlds stretched out like gemstones on a necklace. One of these worlds, third from its star, lies at a distance where liquid water might exist on its surface. Intrigued, you set your spectroscope to examine the atmosphere (if any) of this orbiting rock.

A Blast (of Gas) from the Past
07
May
2012

Science and Truth

There’s one rather cynical way of looking at science that goes something like this: everything in science eventually turns out to be wrong.

You can understand where such thoughts originate. Once, the best scientists in the world told us that space and time were separate. Then along came Einstein to show how they were linked. Scientists once thought that continents had always existed right where they are today. Then Eugene Wegener showed that continents drift across the globe. Once we thought atoms were indivisible. Then along came a whole zoo of particles that stream out of atoms every time we hit them hard enough. Maybe, this line of thought goes, science just describes what we can see today. When we can see more (with better telescopes, better microscopes, and so on), science will tell us something totally different.

Science and Truth
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